Bakery scientists boost fibre content using food waste streams

Bakery scientists boost fibre content using food waste streams

Bakery scientists at Campden BRI have drastically improved the fibre content of tortilla wraps by utilising food waste streams.

The scientists replaced 20% of the ordinary flour present in a traditional tortilla with butternut squash skin powder, increasing the tortilla’s fibre by 97%.

As well as providing consumers with easier ways to boost the fibre content in their diet, this approach can also enable manufacturers to repurpose and reduce food waste.

The ‘Calorie Reduction and fibre enhancement’ project is funded by Campden BRI’s members and is focussed on tapping food waste streams to incorporate highly fibrous foods into products.

In this instance, the research team created the protein-packed powder by grinding up butternut squash peels supplied by Campden BRI member, Barfoots of Botley.

There’s a pressing need for innovative approaches such as this that boost the fibre content of everyday food products. On average, people in the UK do not eat enough fibre.

To address this issue, the bakery scientists are currently trialling different types of commercial fibres at varying concentrations in a pizza base, tomato sauce and in meatballs, while assessing any characteristics that may affect product quality or consumer acceptability.