Sunday, June 7, 2020

How is the most expensive food in the world packaged?

In the age of sustainable packaging and a heavy focus on recycling, it would be reasonable to assume that the biggest brands on the planet are doing everything they can to help save the planet and reduce plastic waste.

In this article, we take a look at some of the most expensive food items in the world and see how they are packaged. What are the materials used and how are they designed?

What is the most expensive food in the world?

A lot of the world’s most expensive food is designed as a way for a restaurant to gain attention or break records, and the dishes and drinks are rarely bought by anyone. Occasionally, some of the most affluent people in the world will seek out extraordinary food items, though, and when they do there are a number of exciting and amazing things to choose from.

The most luxurious food and drinks often include elements that would fetch a hefty price tag when sold individually. For instance, one of the most expensive cocktails in the world is made up of 1788 Clos de Griffier, Vieux Cognac and 1770 Kummel Liqueur. This is called the Salvatore’s Legacy, which can be found at the Salvador Playboy Bar in London and is priced at £5,970 a glass. In terms of food items, one of the most expensive pizzas on the planet features white truffles and gold – two hugely expensive items. The pizza itself fetches £1,670.

What are the common themes with the packaging?

Luxury food items that are sold outside of restaurants usually come in such opulent packaging that it is unlikely anyone would ever cast it away with the rest of their rubbish. Take the most expensive water in the world, for example. Acqua di Cristallo Tributo a Modigliani sells at £41,335 for a 750ml bottle, but it’s not the content of the receptacle that commands such a high price: it is actual the bottle itself, which is a hand-made, 24-karat-gold sculpture inspired by the Italian artist Amedeo Clemente Modigliani. The great thing about this water is that the proceeds from its sale have gone on to raise funds for a foundation geared towards battling global warming.

Gold is a common theme when it comes to the packaging of lavish items, and the Almas Caviar is another example of a dish served in the precious metal. This too comes in a 24-karat tin, and each one retails at £23,425.

The most expensive and luxury food items in the world wouldn’t be worth so much if they were served in plastic packaging that is harmful to the environment. The dishes usually come in gold or crystal bottles and tins, and the packaging is designed to be used as an ornament after the product within has been finished. It is also encouraging to know that the money earned from them has often been used to help the planet.

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