Thursday, October 28, 2021

Lockdown leads to new wave of food businesses

The financial hardship and job uncertainty experienced by many during the coronavirus pandemic has provided the final push for thousands of aspiring entrepreneurs to start their food collection and delivery businesses, according to new research.

634 new food businesses were created by Britons on furlough, while the number of registrations by those made redundant increased by a third (33%) from last year to create 1,450 new companies.

14% of new food collection and delivery registrations – around 1,270 enterprises – were the result of a need for an extra source of income, according to research published in the ‘Boom or Bust: Beginning a business in a pandemic’ report published by The Accountancy Partnership.

Whilst unemployment and money struggles played a significant part in this surge of business registrations, almost half (46%) of entrepreneurs who started businesses during COVID said they had always wanted to be self-employed or own a business.

“Our research shows that many lockdown entrepreneurs saw creating their own takeaway food businesses as their only option after being made redundant or facing other financial troubles, but the statistic of those fulfilling longer-term dreams of owning a business is hugely encouraging,” said Lee Murphy, Managing Director of The Accountancy Partnership.

“It means that even businesses launched out of necessity have people behind them with a genuine desire to be business owners. This enthusiasm will help fledgling businesses thrive despite the adverse circumstances of their inceptions.”

The research shows that an ever-growing interest in side-hustles has also contributed to the new business boom, with more than a fifth (21%) of pandemic-born businesses starting their life in this way.

This 40% increase from 2019 is likely a result of people having more time on their hands due to lockdown restrictions, isolation and furlough, with enterprising Britons using their free time to monetise a skill or hobby.

“The ‘lockdown-preneurs’ have some difficult waters ahead of them as we navigate the rest of the pandemic and the recovery period, but our research suggests that there are enthusiastic, passionate people behind a significant number of lockdown businesses and that is critical to success,” said Mr Murphy.

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